Start Exercising Now: Busy Times Can Be the Best
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  1. Start Exercising Now: Busy Times Can Be the Best

    “I don’t have time.”

    “I’m too busy.”

    “Maybe later when there’s not so much going on.”

    We hear this throughout the year. “I don’t have time” is why people don’t exercise.

    Believe it or not, the holidays could be the PERFECT time to start working out for many of you.

    “It’s so easy to say you’re too busy during the holidays, so you’ll wait until the new year,” says longtime fitness coach and entrepreneur Rick Mayo.

    “Flip the script and do it now,” Rick says. “Use this as an opportunity more than an obstacle to say, ‘I’m going to work out during the holidays, and this will pay massive dividends in the future,’ because there are going to be other seasons of life that are busy.”

    Plus, exercise helps you manage stress. And you’ll be ahead of the New Year’s Resolution rush!

    Rick has two other suggestions we like for making it through this hectic time:

    1. Move your body more every day. Get up and walk, dance… whatever. “Don’t overthink it. It doesn’t have to be quantified. Just move.”
    2. Prioritize protein. Focus on protein first, which helps you feel full and keeps your energy levels sustained. Then add vegetables on the side. Don’t head into a meal hungry when you’re likely to go for high-carb sides and drinks.

    Why wait for the New Year’s when you can start now and have a strong foundation going into the new year? Our 21-Day Strength and Longevity program is a great way to get started.

    Simple steps to success lead to happy holidays!

     

  2. Take on Hiking: It’s good for you

     

    Hiking: Get Outside and Get Moving!

    Martin Pazzani likes to recall a day that changed his life.

    Three decades ago, when he was 34, Martin went hiking in the New Hampshire mountains. Coming down, he saw a remarkably fit man running up. As the man approached, Martin realized the runner was his grandfather’s age, and he asked how the senior citizen was able to do this.

    “He said, ‘I’ve been running up this hill twice a week since I was a little kid. It’s the fountain of youth. See ya, Sonny!’ ”

    Martin watched, dumbstruck, as the man kept climbing.

    Today, Martin has hiked countless peaks on all seven continents. He has decades of experience as a leader in the fitness industry. And he wants more people over 50 to have the strength, agility and stamina to enjoy the outdoors more often. He has a book out in June called “Secrets of Aging Well: Get Outside.”

    Exercise and Sunshine Are Vital

    Martin stresses that being outdoors is good for our immune systems and mood, and hiking provides a vigorous workout, complete with endurance and high-intensity intervals. And, super-important for people later in life, it improves balance.

    Gym and studio workouts make it more fun and safer — with squats, lunges, rope-jumping and more exercises. And it all combines to improve joint flexibility and more.

    If you’re not sure how to begin, Martin keeps it simple: “Walking is where it all starts,” he says. So start with a short distance, then add to it, maybe carry a backpack and add some poles.

    He has dozens of stories of mature people who took up hiking after health difficulties. Allan, 81, had both knees replaced, both hips replaced, and two heart surgeries. Susan started after a mastectomy and then formed a 10,000-member hiking club.

    We realize most people aren’t going to reach such heights, and that’s great. We’re here to help you get or stay fit enough for fun activities like hiking, running, biking, and more that will keep you moving.

    Other Wellbeing Tips

    Exercise and being outdoors improve our wellbeing. Here, Martin shares other tips for a better quality of life (and less need for healthcare and medicine).

    1. Unplug from technology. It’s getting harder to do all the time. But it’s important to set limits to how much time you stare at your phone or computer screen. It actually will lower your stress level and improve your attention span.
    2. No music during your walk or hike. Martin says it can produce stress, tension and cortisol, the stress hormone that leads to weight gain, depression and worse. Plus, the silence is – you know – golden when it comes to heightening mindfulness and enjoying the moment. At the gym, too many people turn up their music so loud to cover up ambient noises. Let it go.
    3. Go to the top of something, even a tall building, and enjoy the view. Most people focus their vision on screens or other up-close items, which affects eyesight and mood. With altitude you can take in the horizon and engage the full range of eye muscles, lowering stress levels. If no tall building or hill is available, try the beach or open field – anywhere with a long-distance view.
  3. Stay Fit After 50

     

    Why Fight to be Fit after 50? Plenty of Reasons!

    If young people exercise largely so they can look good, well, then: Bully for them!

    But by age 50, 60 or so, we’re less concerned about being “beach-body ready.” We’re more motivated by things that go deep into our consciousness and values. Some people find it helps them stick with it if they identify a primary motivator – a main reason they can remember on those days when they might not feel like it.

    Being in good physical shape – with strength, endurance and flexibility – helps us remain independent and enjoy living as we please. And in the face of a global pandemic, it helps fortify us against the coronavirus.

    We love hearing what drives people to live a better life. We want to know: What are your powerful, compelling reasons to run, swim, lift weights, ride bikes, etc.?

    Most people say one or several of these:

    • Playing with grandchildren
    • Reducing medication
    • Travel
    • Enjoying sports and hobbies
    • Avoiding obesity, hypertension and falls
    • Social interaction
    • Better recovery from surgeries
    • Treatment of chronic conditions like Parkinson’s, diabetes and more

    Do any of those strike a chord with you?
    Any reason is a good reason. Heck, you don’t even have to have one. “Just because” is a great answer!

    But try thinking about it. Tie that reason around your finger (figuratively, of course). You might find the reminder helpful.

  4. Tips on Maintaining Wellness

     

    Tips to Maintain Wellness During This Strange Time

    Fitness is so important after 50, especially now when we’ve all been spending more time at home. That’s why we’ve been doing everything we can to help you stay physically active during this time.

    But it’s also helpful to remember the other elements of wellness, too. We might have to put a little more energy into maintaining our overall wellbeing nowadays. But trust us: There’s nothing more important.

    Let’s review the main components of wellbeing. Then we’ll share some tips on what you can do for them.

    What Is Wellness?

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) writes “People often think about wellness in terms of physical health — nutrition, exercise, weight management, etc., but it is so much more. Wellness is a holistic integration of physical, mental, and spiritual well-being, fueling the body, engaging the mind, and nurturing the spirit.”

    There are many definitions, all generally meaning the same thing. We like this from one from the University of California:

    “Wellness is an active process of becoming aware of and making choices toward a healthy and fulfilling life. Wellness is more than being free from illness, it is a dynamic process of change and growth.”

    Most experts list six to eight categories. Feel free to adapt the list as necessary but remember to keep it as broad and robust as your life. Here’s the breakdown provided by the International Council on Active Aging:

    • Physical – Exercise and nutrition are essential to maintaining independence and health. Period.
    • Emotional – “coping with challenges and behaving in trustworthy and respectful ways.”
    • Intellectual/Cognitive – “engaging in creative pursuits and intellectually stimulating activities.”
    • Professional/Vocational – using your “skills while providing personal satisfaction,” including as mentors, volunteers, caregivers, and more in retirement.
    • Social – “interactions with family, friends, neighbors and chosen peer groups.”
    • Spiritual – “living with a meaning and purpose in life, guided by personal values.”
    • Environmental – practicing habits that promote a healthy environment; understanding how different environments affect you.

    Some Simple Tips

    1. Move More / Sit Less. Every little thing you can do adds up. So put on some fun music and dance… stand up and walk around during TV commercials… work in your garden put away the dishes, and fold the laundry. Go for a walk, jog, or bike ride outdoors.
    2. Volunteer online or over the phone. Call local charitable organizations, community centers, and your religious leader to see how you can help.
    3. Express yourself. Write in a journal, paint, play music, or sing. Talk about your feelings with family, friends, a therapist, or a spiritual leader. Don’t be shy about calling people. Everyone is stressed about this, not just you.
    4. Limit the time you watch the news or look at social media. It’s responsible to stay informed, but once or twice a day should do it. More than that can lead to being overwhelmed.
    5. Order jigsaw puzzles, T-shirts or coffee mugs with photos of your family or pets on them.
    6. Meditate or pray each day. Schedule the time and treat it as an important appointment.
    7. Keep a clean, orderly home.
    8. Read books. Talk about them in an online book club or with family and friends.
    9. Research for your next trip, or plan something to look forward to.
    10. Try to be thankful, tolerant, and patient with yourself and others.

    We’ll get through this. Remember to join our online workouts, and reach out to us at any time. We’re here for you now and in the future.

  5. Squash, Lentil & Coconut Soup

     

    Curried Squash, Lentil & Coconut Soup

    Flavor up butternut squash with Indian spices for this warming and healthy vegetarian soup. From BBCGoodFood.com and recommended as an immune-boosting recipe.

    Ingredients

    • 1 tbsp olive oil
    • 1 butternut squash, peeled, deseeded and diced
    • 200g carrot, diced
    • 1 tbsp curry powder containing turmeric
    • 100g red lentil
    • 700ml low-sodium vegetable stock
    • 1 can reduced-fat coconut milk
    • coriander and naan bread, to serve

    Method

    1. Heat the oil in a large saucepan, add the squash and carrots, sizzle for 1 min, then stir in the curry powder and cook for 1 min more. Tip in the lentils, the vegetable stock and coconut milk and give everything a good stir. Bring to the boil, then turn the heat down and simmer for 15-18 mins until everything is tender.
    2. Using a hand blender or in a food processor, blitz until as smooth as you like. Season and serve scattered with roughly chopped coriander and some naan bread alongside.

    Nutritional Info

    178 calories, 7g fat, 5g saturated fat, 22g carbs, 9g sugars, 4g fiber, 6g protein, 0.4g salt

  6. Know How to Prevent Stroke

    Stroke is common and serious. But we can learn how to prevent strokes by lowering our risk through exercise and other lifestyle habits. And spotting the symptoms early can greatly lower the odds of permanent damage, according to the American Heart Association.

    Doctors recommend exercise and healthy eating to improve overall heart health. They also suggest maintaining a healthy weight, drinking only in moderation, and not smoking.

    Stroke is an interruption of blood flow to the brain. It can be fatal. Some 800,000 strokes occur annually in the US alone.

    And the AHA has a handy way to educate us about spotting a stroke early enough to get help that could save a life or greatly mitigate permanent damage.

    1. Face. One side of the face is drooping.
    2. Arms. Arm or leg weakness.
    3. Speech. Speech difficulty.
    4. Time. Time to call for an ambulance immediately.

    With February cited as American Heart Month, the AHA also points out:

    • Stroke risk increases with age.
    • African-Americans are twice as likely for a first-time stroke as white people.
    • High blood pressure contributes to 75 percent of first strokes.
    • Adults need at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous activity each week.
    • More exercise brings more benefits.
    • Keep exercising and eating right even if you’re on medicine for high blood pressure and cholesterol.

    It’s all just more encouragement to live a healthy life and to encourage loved ones to exercise, eat right, and practice other positive daily choices. Visit the heart association or talk to your doctor to learn more.

  7. How Exercise Is Key to Overall Wellness (and Quality of Life)

     

    You know that exercise is the key to physical fitness, especially later in life. But did you also know that fitness is, in turn, the key to wellness, or our overall wellbeing, as we age?

    That’s right. Having strength, stamina, and agility well after 50 are integral to maintaining our quality of life at any age. Not only does it improve our physical health, but fitness also is the bedrock of maintaining the other components of wellness, including our emotional and spiritual lives.

    If we have our health, we have everything it is said. If we’re fit, we can maintain our independence and zest for living at any stage of life.

    What Is Wellness?

    Maybe you’ve heard wellness discussed and wonder what that word means.

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) writes, “People often think about wellness in terms of physical health — nutrition, exercise, weight management, etc., but it is so much more. Wellness is a holistic integration of physical, mental, and spiritual well-being, fueling the body, engaging the mind, and nurturing the spirit.”

    There are many definitions, all generally meaning the same thing. We like this from one from the University of California:

    “Wellness is an active process of becoming aware of and making choices toward a healthy and fulfilling life. Wellness is more than being free from illness, and it is a dynamic process of change and growth.”

    Most experts list six to eight categories. Feel free to adapt the list as necessary but remember to keep it as broad and robust as your life. Here’s the breakdown provided by the International Council on Active Aging:

    • Physical – Exercise and nutrition are essential to maintaining independence and health. Period.
    • Emotional – “coping with challenges and behaving in trustworthy and respectful ways.”
    • Intellectual/Cognitive – “engaging in creative pursuits and intellectually stimulating activities.”
    • Professional/Vocational – using your “skills while providing personal satisfaction,” including as mentors, volunteers, caregivers, and more in retirement.
    • Social – “interactions with family, friends, neighbors and chosen peer groups.”
    • Spiritual – “living with meaning and purpose in life, guided by personal values.”
    • Environmental – practicing habits that promote a healthy environment; understanding how different environments affect you.

    Why Habits Are So Important

    The NIH makes no bones about it.

    “Habits very much influence health, well-being, and quality of life. If you are striving to improve these, you need to think about habits, because if you change your habits for the better, you change your life for the better,” it says.

    Making good changes and reinforcing good habits are helped by strategies like scheduling, accountability, convenience, and more.

    In other words, even if you are over 50-years-old, being part of a gym or fitness community is an invaluable way to build the solid wellness you want and deserve. Let our team of Certified Functional Aging Specialists help you start or continue on the lifelong journey to wellness.

    Call or email us now to get started on a functional exercise program that will get you fit for life. You can do this!

    Not local? Find a Certified Functional Aging Specialist near you. 

  8. How to Keep It Off (5 Fit Body Secrets)

    It takes dedicated hard work to drop a significant number of pounds. But afterwards it’s incredibly easy (and frustrating!) to find those pounds creeping back on.

    Maintaining fat loss certainly is possible, however it does require that you remain vigilant with your healthy routine.

    Here are 5 secrets to maintaining your amazing body transformation for life. Think of these as your own personal lifestyle rules and stick with them at least 90% of the time to keep your body healthy and fit.

    Fit Body Secret #1: Don’t Eat Just To Eat

    There is no place in your healthy lifestyle for mindless snacking. I’m talking about a tub of popcorn at the movies or a bag of chips in front of the TV. All the calories ingested from mindless snacking have to end up somewhere…and that somewhere is around your waist or on your thighs.

    Snacks are fine when you are aware of how much you’re eating in order to balance it with the rest of your meals for the day.

    Fit Body Secret #2: Stand (And Walk) When Possible

    Have you heard the saying sitting is the new smoking? The idea is that a lifetime of sitting all-day-every-day is as harmful to your body as smoking. Think for a moment about how much of your day is spent sitting.

    You wake up and sit down for breakfast, sit on the drive to work, take the elevator up and sit for most of 8 hours at work, take the elevator down, sit on the drive home, to eat dinner, and to watch TV.

    That’s quite a bit of time spent sitting! Now imagine if you consciously stood for some of this time each day and took the stairs instead of the elevator. Over weeks, and months, it really adds up in calories burned, muscles engaged, and overall fitness and health.

    Fit Body Secret #3: Avoid Sugar

    I might sound like a broken record about this one, but that’s OK, I’ll keep harping on this point until more people listen. Our bodies weren’t designed to ingest large amounts of sugar on a daily basis. When you regularly take in excess sugar, the results are always the same. You. Gain. Weight.

    The tricky part is that sugar is all around us, so avoiding it takes real vigilance.

    Start with your morning beverage of choice. Does it have sugar in it? Most of the beverages that are blended and brewed at coffee shops are simply vehicles for ingesting sugar. Find a beverage that you enjoy without any added sugar and stick with the rule of not drinking sugary beverages throughout your day.

    Fit Body Secret #4: Keep Dinner Light

    Who says that dinner should be the biggest and heartiest meal of the day? Instead, focus on enjoying light dinners that are centered around protein and veggies and avoid starches and carbs in the evening.

    The recipe below for Beet and Grapefruit Salad is a great example. Add a grilled chicken breast to a serving of this vibrant, fiber-filled salad and you have a nutritious dinner that’s light and healthy.

    Fit Body Secret #5: Always Exercise

    How often do you brush your teeth? Do you sometimes take a few weeks or months off brushing your teeth? Um, no. That’s gross. You brush your teeth everyday as an ongoing habit because you know that the benefits outweigh the slight inconvenience.

    Can you see where I’m going with this? 🙂

    Exercise only truly works when you do it as an ongoing habit because you know that the benefits outweigh the slight inconvenience. It’s part of keeping you healthy. It’s part of who you are.

    I’m here to make your daily exercise habit fun and effective. If you aren’t yet my client then call or email today to join now.

    Let’s do this!

  9. That feels good…

    I realized something important about exercise that’s worth sharing with you.

    Most of the time, when encouraging you to exercise, I focus on health and the difference between weight loss and fat loss. These are two significant benefits, but there’s another side effect of exercise that’s hugely important…

    How you feel after doing it.

    Every workout has an immediate impact on your energy, mood, body chemistry, and even mental functioning. The endorphins released are specifically designed to make you feel good.

    All of these factors combined create your overall feeling of wellbeing.

    Don’t you want to feel good?

    The tricky part is that most of us are habit driven. So, our activity level (or lack thereof) is fairly consistent day-to-day and week-to-week. This makes the impact of each sedentary day less noticeable, since another similar day causes no obvious change. It simply perpetuates your current state of un-wellbeing, with a slow decline.

    Why this matters: You could begin feeling a lot better than you do today by starting to exercise.

    This could come as a surprise, especially if you believe that the way you feel today is a given, and not something that can be improved.

    By maintaining a consistent, challenging exercise plan:

    • Your aches and pains can disappear.
    • You can feel light and your energy levels can soar.
    • Your mood can naturally become more optimistic.
    • You can avoid illness and disease.
    • You can think and process information quicker and with more clarity.

    And then, once you’re in the groove of exercising regularly, you’ll forget about the pain, the sluggishness, and the discomfort that you used to live with.

    Making regular exercise part of your routine is a foolproof method for improving your overall wellbeing. It’s a gift that you give to yourself with each workout.

    Ready to really feel good? Sign up for my latest fitness program. Call or email today to get started!

  10. Recipe (Lean Protein): Lemon Herb Roasted Chicken Breasts

    What is Metabolism?

    Do “calories” really count?

    Well, yes they do, but they’re not the only thing that matters when it comes to how much you weigh and how much energy you have.  In other words it’s all about your metabolism.

    In a nutshell metabolism is how you take in oxygen and food and use them for energy, heat, and storage.  But what’s really more important is how fast your metabolism works i.e. your “metabolic rate”.  And you may have heard of RMR and TDEE, which are ways to measure your metabolic rate.

    But, what you may really want to know is what affects your metabolic rate, and how can you use that to your advantage.  Of course it’s not just about how much you eat but also your hormones, body composition, and even what you eat counts!

    Click here to read the full post about metabolism, what affects your metabolic rate and try my new recipe for a lean (metabolism-boosting) protein!

    Serves 4

    Try my new recipe for a lean (metabolism-boosting) protein!

    Recipe (Lean Protein): Lemon Herb Roasted Chicken Breasts

    • 2 lemons, sliced
    • 1 tablespoon rosemary
    • 1 tablespoon thyme
    • 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
    • 4 chicken breasts (boneless, skinless)
    • dash salt & pepper
    • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive old

    Preheat oven to 425F.  Layer ½ of the lemon slices on the bottom of a baking dish.  Sprinkle with ½ of the herbs and ½ of the sliced garlic.

    Place the chicken breasts on top and sprinkle salt & pepper.  Place remaining lemon, herbs and garlic on top of the chicken.  Drizzle with olive oil.  Cover with a lid or foil.

    Bake for 45 minutes until chicken is cooked through.  If you want the chicken to be a bit more “roasty” then remove the lid/foil and broil for another few minutes (watching carefully not to burn it)

    Serve & enjoy!

    Tip: You can add a leftover sliced chicken breast to your salad for lunch the next day!


Your Personal Best Location
Your Personal Best Training Studio
Doddridge Plaza
3765 S. Alameda, Ste 102
Corpus Christi, TX 78411
(361) 857-5087 info@ypbtrainingstudio.com