Benefits of Exercise Have No Age Limit, Study Finds
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  1. Benefits of Exercise Have No Age Limit, Study Finds

    A massive study made headlines by concluding that not exercising is worse for your health than smoking and diabetes.

    But many readers over 50 will be glad to know that the study also has a vast age-related finding: The spectacular benefits of exercise have no age limit.

    “Whether you’re in your 40s or your 80s, you will benefit in the same way,” said the study’s senior author, Dr. Wael Jaber, a cardiologist at the Cleveland Clinic.

    The study says that sedentary people are almost four times as likely to die early as those who exercise regularly. It looked at 122,000 people who were tested on treadmills over 13 years.

    “There is no ceiling for the benefit of exercise,” he said. “There’s no age limit that doesn’t benefit from being physically fit.”

    So, if you’re already exercising regularly, then keep it up.

    But sadly, most Americans of all ages don’t get enough exercise. Some good news: People over 70 are the fastest-growing segment of the population to use personal trainers, according to the Personal Training Development Center.

    We believe this study and the trend show – that exercise is suitable for everyone, regardless of age. Try our 21-Day Strength and Balance Program to see guaranteed, and let us show you how comfortable, safe, and fun it is to stay healthy and live longer.

  2. Thrive in Your Fitness Journey

    Did you start the new year with a big fitness goal – like losing weight or going to the gym three times a week?

    And have you found it hard to stick to it, like so many people do every year?

    While setting goals can motivate, it’s easy to get discouraged when we don’t see immediate progress or face unexpected setbacks. Instead of focusing on specific goals, what if we shifted our attention to the process of improving ourselves every day, one step at a time?

    Think back to when you took out a mortgage or a car loan. It was overwhelming to imagine paying it all back at once – and much less overwhelming to rely on the schedule of payments, right?

    There were roadblocks then, but you overcame them.

    And now, if anyone feels shy about joining a gym, especially later in life, we get it, and we’re here to make it as welcoming, fun, and safe as possible—no need to worry. You’re starting too late or won’t know what you’re doing. With the right mindset and approach, anyone can become a fitter, healthier version of themselves, regardless of age or fitness level.

    Focus on the Process, Not the Goals

    So, let’s forget about outcomes for now and focus on doing what’s necessary to live the healthy life you deserve.

    1. Never underestimate the Fun Factor! Choose activities you enjoy. Maybe you prefer strength training, yoga, or cardio workouts. Experiment to see what you like best and what makes you feel good. Please talk with us about your goals, and be open-minded about what might help get you where you want to go.
    2. Set realistic expectations. Aim to improve daily, even just taking a short walk or squats at home. Don’t try to do too much too soon and get disappointed when significant results don’t come immediately.
    3. Listen to your body and adjust your routine as needed. Don’t push too hard or try to keep up with others at the gym. If you’re feeling tired or sore, try something else. A good trainer will adjust workouts for any concern you have.
    4. Seek support and guidance. Ask a personal trainer or gym staff for exercise advice and proper technique. Join one of our classes or small-group sessions, or find a workout buddy. You’ll keep each other motivated and accountable.
    5. Celebrate your progress and be kind to yourself – just like a friend. Remember the joy in the journey, not just the destination. You improve your health and well-being whenever you go to the gym or do something active. Smile at your progress and the positive changes you’re making!

    All it takes is a little effort every day, and it all adds up over time to a better, stronger, more vibrant life for you to enjoy. See us, and let’s get going! If you are ready to improve the quality of your life by restoring your strength, improving your balance, & reducing your joint pain so you can enjoy your favorite activities, try our 21-Day Strength and Balance Program for guaranteed results!

  3. Gift Guide: Keep Your Sweetie Sweating

     

    Regarding Valentine’s Day gifts, anybody can come with a box of chocolates and red wine.

    Not that there’s anything wrong with either one! But… wouldn’t you be showing a more supportive love with a fitness-related gift to keep your sweetie encouraged?

    Here are a few ideas to get you thinking in the right direction!

    1. The Etsy artisans have many clever, unique gifts, and you can personalize many. Enter the rabbit hole here.
    2. Put together a gift basket of healthy snacks and supplements that match your beloved’s diet or lifestyle. This could be a ton of fun to put together.
    3. A water bottle that also stores phones, keys, wallets, etc.
    4. A couples massage – or massage oil to use at home.
    5. Sexy nightwear. From silky lingerie to plain white boxers, the options are endless.
    6. An upgrade at the gym. Get your S.O. a session, or several, with a trainer, for example.
    7. Order a big bunch of healthy fruit, starting with Edible Arrangements. They have some beautiful Valentine’s Day packages.
    8. Standbys, like leggings, socks, or a new yoga mat.

    And finally, a gift that costs nothing: Your support and encouragement. Nothing says “I love you” more than “Let’s stay healthy for each other.” If your partner is fit or trying to get started, offer support.

    If you and your significant partner want to join a gym filled with like-minded peers who will offer extra support in your health and fitness journey, try our 21-Day Strength and Longevity Program, and one of our functional aging experts will assist you in reaching your fitness goals.

     

  4. Fitness Love Story: ‘A Team’

    What’s the secret to a long, happy marriage?

    For Karl and Susan, who just celebrated 61 years together, it’s a combination.

    Like being kind and thoughtful with each other while maintaining common interests and enjoying walks on the beach…

    And keeping the romance alive, with sweet gestures every day, like how he brings her tea in bed every morning…

    And … EXERCISE!

    That’s right. They started decades ago when he was a college professor, and they kept it up at home, in gyms, in different states, and now in retirement. Currently, in their 80s, the pair have been working out together thrice a week for 35 years.

    “I think it’s one of the wonderful things we do together,” Karl says. “It’s very nice to have this joint hobby.”

    Karl and Susan are just one of the countless couples over 50 who enjoy regular exercise together.
    We love welcoming pairs over 50 because we see how they’re improving their health, strengthening their relationship, and setting a positive example.

    Psychology Today shared findings about the benefits of exercising with a romantic partner. It is “associated with greater positive mood during exercise —beyond the happiness boost that results from the exercise itself — and it correlated with higher positive mood (but not reduced negative mood) during the day. Lastly, it was related to greater relationship satisfaction.”

    The research – and Karl and Susan – prove:

    • Exercise makes us feel good, so doing it together can have powerful effects on the relationship.
    • It also demonstrates support and encouragement for your partner.
    • Many of us work harder when we’re with someone – and who can get us revved up more than our No. 1 person?
    • Research also finds that having shared interests is suitable for a relationship. It gives you something positive to do together, to talk about together.
    • It’s also a way to spend quality time together – whether at the gym or walking the dog, ballroom dancing, or gardening in the backyard.
    • And the ways our bodies react to exercise – faster heart rate, shortness of breath, sweaty palms – are similar to the feelings of romantic attraction. So, working up a sweat together can be great for your physical connection.

    Karl and Susan enjoy their friendship with their trainer, who guides them through resistance and balance work. And they value the social connections they’ve found at the gym.

    They keep the romance alive by saying “I love you” several times a day, holding hands, and encouraging each other at home and the gym.

    “We’re both upbeat people, and we cheer each other on,” she says. “Bad things have happened, but you pick up your suitcases and keep going. All along, we’ve been a team.”

    >Come see us at Your Personal Best Training Studio, where our functional aging specialist can assist you and your significant other to move better, feel better, and do all the things you love to do now and will love to do the rest of your life. Click the link to try our 21-Day Strength and Longevity Program.

  5. Healthy Recipe, Spaghetti Squash

    Spaghetti squash is so named because its flesh forms long, tender strands when shredded with a fork after cooking. Its mild taste pairs easily with myriad ingredients. Plus, it’s low in carbs, gluten-free, and high in vitamin A and other essential nutrients—no wonder this pale-yellow, oblong-shaped squash is having a moment with fitness fans.

    This recipe, adapted from “Listen to Your Vegetables: Italian-Inspired Recipes for Every Season” (Harvest, $45), offers a handy trick for boosting its deliciousness in several notches. After the cut halves steam in the oven, the cooked strands are spread out on a baking sheet and returned to the stove, allowing the flavors to concentrate and caramelize as the moisture evaporates. Mixed with cheese and herbs and heaped back in its shell, run under the broiler until bubbly; it becomes your favorite spaghetti sauce’s new best friend. Sorry, pasta! Serves 4. RECIPE HERE. – Susan Puckett

    Ingredients

    • 2 small spaghetti squash (2 to 2 ½ pounds each)
    • Kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper
    • 1 tablespoon olive oil, plus more for coating the foil
    • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
    • 2 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves or chopped oregano leaves, plus more for garnish
    • 4 ounces of burrata or fresh mozzarella torn into small pieces
    • Quick Marinara Sauce (recipe follows) or your favorite pasta sauce, optional

    Instructions

    1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Set the squash on a cutting board and nestle it in a folded kitchen towel to hold it in place while you cut it. With a heavy, sharp chef’s knife or serrated knife, carefully cut the squash in half lengthwise, rocking the knife gently back and forth after you cut through the skin. (If you’re struggling, you can zap it in the microwave for 3-5 minutes to soften it before cutting.)
    2.  With a spoon, scoop out the seeds and discard them.
    3. Line a baking sheet with foil and brush it lightly with oil. Season the squash halves well with salt and pepper and drizzle with a tablespoon of olive oil.
    4. Set the squash halves cut side down on the baking sheet. Roast in the preheated oven for 30 minutes or until the squash skins are tender to the touch.
    5.  Remove the pan from the oven, leaving the oven on. Let the cooked squash rest for about 10 minutes, allowing it to steam as it slowly cools, then flip. With a fork, gently pull and shred the squash from the skins, forming spaghetti-like strands. Spread the strands on the oiled baking sheet. Set aside two of the squash skins for later.
    6. Return the baking sheet with the shredded squash to the oven and roast for 20 to 30 minutes, or until caramelized (but not burned) in places and dried out a bit.
    7. Place the double-roasted squash in a bowl and toss with 1 cup of parmesan, thyme, oregano, and plenty of cracked black pepper. (Squash may be kept at room temperature for a couple of hours before broiling.) divide the mixture between the reserved squash skins and top with the burrata and remaining parmesan.
    8. Before serving, ensure a rack is set about 4 inches from the heat source and turn the broiler high. Place the squash under the broiler for 5 to 6 minutes or until golden and bubbling and the skins of the squash are slightly charred.
    9.  Remove from the oven, garnish with more herbs, cut in half, and serve with pasta sauce if desired.

    Quick Marinara Sauce
    Makes 2 cups
    Ingredients

    • 2 tablespoons olive oil
    • 3 cloves garlic (or more or less), minced
    • Pinch of red pepper flakes
    • ½ cup finely chopped parsley (leaves and stems)
    • 1 (28-ounce) can of crushed tomatoes
    • 1 bay leaf
    • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano (or 1 teaspoon dried)
    • Kosher salt and black pepper to taste

    Instructions

    1. In a large skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and the red pepper flakes, if using, and sauté for a minute or until the garlic begins to turn golden. Stir in the parsley and sauté another minute.
    2. Add the tomatoes, bay leaf, and oregano and lower the heat to a simmer, occasionally stirring, until slightly thickened, 15 or 20 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

    Susan Puckett is a cookbook author and former food editor of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Follow her at susanpuckett.com.

  6. Working Out Brings Better Sleep

    Millions of people don’t get enough sleep every night, even if they know how important it is to their physical and mental health.

    And as we age, some people have extra trouble getting the right amount of rest (which varies for each individual, of course).

    But here’s one thing everyone should know: Exercise will help you get more and better sleep. Studies show that regular, moderately intense exercise improves sleep length and quality. Whether it’s walking, running, weightlifting, yoga…

    “Sleep quality and quantity are two important aspects of reducing stress, improving mood, and providing lots of energy,” the Functional Aging Institute says. “Lack of sleep and stress go hand in hand.”

    The National Sleep Foundation adds, “Not only will getting your zzzs help you perform on a test, learn a new skill or help you stay on task, but it may also be a critical factor in your health, weight, and energy level.”

    After 65, sleep issues can increase accidents, falls, cognitive decline, depression, and more.

    Here are a few tips for restful nights.

    • Don’t exercise too close to bedtime since it can stimulate your brain and raise your body temperature, changes that can keep you up.
    • Maintain bedtime routines and schedules.
    • Get some sunlight every day.
    • Keep your bedroom cool, dark, and free of electronics.
    • Avoid caffeine after noon and too much alcohol close to bedtime.
    • Don’t drink much of anything as bedtime approaches; it could make you need to get out of bed.
    • Talk to your doctor about chronic issues. You could have sleep apnea or another serious but treatable disorder.

    When you’re not sleeping, train with us at Your Personal Best Training Studio, where our functional aging experts can assist you with your health and fitness goals. Try our 21-Day Strength and Longevity Program to restore your strength and improve your balance. Guaranteed results.

  7. He Found Fitness After Fighting Cancer

    Todd Allen and his wife took a European trip seven years ago.

    He felt terrible by the time they got home.

    Blood tests revealed cancer. Stage 4. Bone marrow.

    Todd underwent 18 months of chemotherapy and had knee and hip surgery.

    Never much for exercise, Todd then made a decision: “After the recovery, I said I gotta get my act together.”

    “I’ve been a gym rat ever since,” Todd, now 65. Now, with a healthy prognosis, he wakes up early each morning to lift weights, runs stairs, and do other physical activity. “I look better now than I ever have in my life.”

    The Research on Exercise and Cancer

    Research proves that exercise is good for our health at any age. Experts say it also helps prevent cancer and lower its risk of recurring. And regular exercise benefits cancer survivors the same way it helps the general population – by reducing obesity and blood pressure, lowering the risk of heart attack, stroke, diabetes, and more.

    Strength training is essential to help maintain muscle and bone density. People generally lose muscle mass with age, and cancer exacerbates the decline.

    The National Cancer Institute shares robust data about how exercise can reduce the risk of certain cancers:

    • Breast cancer by 20 to 80 percent
    • Endometrial cancer by 20 to 40 percent
    • Colon cancer by 30 to 40 percent

    The Clinical Oncology Society of Australia issued formal guidelines recommending exercise as a part of treatment for all cancer patients. It said:

    • Exercise should be a part of standard care for cancer patients to fight the disease and the side effects of treatment.
    • Treatment teams should promote physical activity so patients meet exercise guidelines.
    • Patients should be referred to an exercise physiologist or physical therapist.

    “If we could turn the benefits of exercise into a pill, it would be demanded by patients, prescribed by every cancer specialist, and subsidized by the government,” said Dr. Prue Cormie, author of the organization’s report. “It would be seen as a major breakthrough in cancer treatment.”

    A healthy lifestyle should include exercise – which also helps limit other factors like obesity and blood pressure before and after cancer.

    After treatment, exercise helps restore self-esteem and a sense of control, which cancer strips from patients, says Andrea Leonard, founder of the Cancer Exercise Training Institute. “Teaching them to regain control empowers them, increases esteem and confidence, and takes them from victim to survivor.”
    ‘Let’s Get Some Life While We’re Here

    For Todd Allen, working out at the gym brings him the variety, social interaction, and mental health benefits he craves.

    “I love the comradery,” he says. “You have to show up, or you get razzed. That’s key for consistency.”

    With his health now solid and his outlook bright, Todd is committed to enjoying every day.

    “Let’s get some life while we’re here,” he says. “I’m going to hold onto this thing for as long as possible.”

    If you want to lower your risk of a heart attack, stroke, diabetes, and cancer while building a camaraderie with like-minded peers, Your Personal Best Training Studio is for you. Our team of functional aging specialists will assist you with your health and fitness goals. Try our 21-Day Strength and Longevity Program to get guaranteed results.

  8. Healthy Recipe, Chinese-Style Hand-Shredded Chicken

    Boneless skinless chicken breasts are versatile, high-protein, low-fat, and convenient to use, but they can quickly turn dry and tasteless if overcooked. This recipe, slightly adapted from one in “The Walks of Life,” relies on a simple poaching method that ensures tender, juicy, aromatic results. Once cooled, the chicken is shredded and dressed in a light soy-based dressing loaded with garlic and ginger (chilies if you like heat), then tossed with red onion slices, cilantro leaves, and toasted sesame seeds — a delightful, low-fuss way to ring in the Chinese New Year (January 22) or to whip up for a healthy entree any day or night. Serves 4. RECIPE HERE. – Susan Puckett

    Ingredients
    For the chicken: 

    • 1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breasts (brought to room temperature 1-2 hours before cooking)
    • 6 cups water
    • 3 thin slices of ginger
    • 1 scallion, halved crosswise

    For the sauce: 

    • 2 tablespoons finely chopped scallions (white parts only)
    • 1 heaping tablespoon garlic (3-4 cloves)
    • 1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
    • 1 or 2 fresh Thai bird’s-eye chilies or a pinch of dried chile flakes (optional)
    • 3 tablespoons neutral oil
    • 2 tablespoons light soy sauce
    • 2 teaspoons Chinese black vinegar (or white rice vinegar or rice wine vinegar)
    • 1 ½ teaspoons oyster sauce
    • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
    • ½ teaspoon ground Sichuan peppercorns
    • ½ teaspoon granulated sugar

    For serving:

    • ½ cup thinly sliced red onion
    • ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro
    • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds
    • Fine sea salt to taste

    Instructions

    1. Prepare the chicken: In a medium pot, combine the water, ginger, and halved scallion and bring it to a boil.
    2. Completely submerge the chicken into the water and allow it to return to a boil. Then immediately reduce the heat to its lowest setting, cover, and simmer for 5 minutes.
    3. Turn off the heat and allow it to continue to steep in the hot liquid, untouched, for 10 minutes. Meanwhile, prepare an ice bath in a large bowl and set it beside the sink.
    4.   Check the chicken for doneness by piercing the thickest part of the meat with a sharp skewer to see if the juices run clear. If not, leave it in the water for 5 more minutes, then check again.
    5. Transfer the chicken to the ice bath for about 5 minutes or until cool enough to handle, then shred the meat and transfer it to a serving plate. (Reserve the flavorful broth, if desired, for cooking jasmine rice or other uses.)
    6. Make the sauce: In a medium heatproof bowl, combine the scallions, garlic, ginger, and chilies (if using). Mix in the soy sauce, vinegar, oyster sauce, sesame oil, ground Sichuan peppercorns, and sugar. Heat the neutral oil in a wok or small saucepan until shimmering, and carefully pour the aromatics into the bowl.
    7. To serve: Toss the chicken in the sauce, along with the onion, cilantro, and sesame seeds. Season to taste with salt. Serve cold or at room temperature.

    Susan Puckett is a cookbook author and former food editor of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Follow her at susanpuckett.com.

  9. Fitness Over 50 Is Hot — Again!

     

    You might not realize it, but if you’re getting fit or staying fit after 50, you are riding the wave of one of the hottest trends in fitness around the world.

    TWO trends, actually, according to the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), which has released its 17th annual survey on the hot topics in the fitness industry.
    Ranked No. 1: wearable technology, like smartwatches and fitness trackers that can monitor heart rate, calories, and other data.

    No. 2: Strength training with free weights, like barbells, dumbbells, and kettlebells.

    No. 3: Body weight training uses the body as its source of resistance.

    Now, each of the top three applies to people over 50, right? You might wear a smartwatch, and we know that strength training is essential for healthy aging, whether with free weights or body weight.

    But the fourth and fifth items on the list get right to it.

    No. 4: Fitness programs for “older adults” made a comeback into the top 10.

    No. 5: Functional fitness training focuses on improving balance, coordination, functional strength, and endurance for everyday activities outside the gym.

    This doesn’t surprise us since we are big believers and advocates for fitness over 50, including functional fitness, whether you want to:

    • Achieve athletic excellence or maintain a healthy weight…
    • Travel the world with confidence, or play with your grandkids…
    • Or feel better, move better, and look better while making your doctor and spouse happy.

    If those are “trendy” concerns, we are pleased to be considered “cool.”

    The list reflects some interesting changes fueled by the Covid-19 pandemic. For example, home gyms fell from No. 2 last year to No. 13.

    “The health and fitness industry is returning to the basics,” said Walter Thompson, former ACSM president and lead author of the survey. That follows how fitness professionals pivoted during the worst months of the pandemic to provide service for people wanting to exercise primarily at home.

    Take This as Encouragement

    We hope this year’s list gives you a little extra encouragement to exercise or keep at it. We know it’s challenging either way sometimes, especially if you are starting.

    But this shows that you’re not alone as an “older” adult pursuing a healthy lifestyle! And we are here to help you feel comfortable, stay safe, and achieve results for the lifestyle YOU WANT TO LIVE.

    Finally, it’s interesting to see how various regions and countries rank trends. For example, Australia ranked “Fitness Programs for Older Adults” first, and Spain led with functional fitness.

    Europe put “bodyweight training” at the top, Mexico liked weight loss programs, and the United States matched the overall global ranking for the top spot, wearable tech.

    Fitness over 50 knows no boundaries. Let’s get it! At Your Personal Best Training Studio, our Functional Aging Specialist will improve your balance, functional strength, and endurance. Start now by trying our 21-Day Strength and Longevity Program.

  10. A Daughter’s Love Worked for Mom

    Sometimes when we’re stuck, it takes a loved one’s guidance to help us take the first step toward reaching a goal.

    It can be that way with fitness over 50, whether the loved one is a spouse, friend – or even an adult child.

    Fitness has a way of bringing people closer together.

    Take Sandy Bauer, 77, who admits that, until recently, she never cared for exercise. She wanted to lose weight, gain confidence, and feel better about her appearance, but nothing motivated her.

    “The worse I looked and felt, I just sat around feeling stuck,” she says. “I couldn’t get out of it.”

    But now, Sandy can’t stand to miss a workout. She’s hooked – losing pounds and feeling better than ever.

    The difference? She took the advice of her daughter, Kim Chiodo, 52, and started working out with Kim’s trainer at a gym.

    “It’s taken me a lot to get started,” Sandy says. “But now that I’m doing it and feeling better, I really enjoy it. I like the way it’s helping me, so it makes me want to keep going.”

    Working out with other people is an excellent route to fitness that millions of older people have found. As Sandy learned, the social interaction provided by exercise is one of its most essential elements for older people.

    And exercising with family members is a great way to share common interests, encourage each other, and establish positive habits without feeling nervous about stepping into a gym or studio for the first time.

    Sandy recently moved to Kim’s city, and that helped, Kim said.

    “I knew her potential, but I could see her aging in a way that I knew she didn’t have to,” said Kim, 52. “She was exhausted, down, and frustrated by her limitations, and I knew she was capable of more.”

    Sandy has been enjoying lifting weights for the first time in her life for more than four months now. And she has learned the vital importance of strength training for older people. It staves off muscle loss, known as sarcopenia, and improves bone density, balance, sleep, and mood.

    Sandy arrives at the gym smiling, happy to talk with everyone she sees because she’s so excited.

    “I feel proud that I have done this,” says Sandy, a former dental assistant.

    But no one is prouder than her daughter, a speech pathologist.

    “I’m so happy that she has this newfound confidence in doing something that she never really explored,” Kim says. “She’s happier. It keeps her mind engaged. It’s elevated her mood. She feels better about herself.

    “It gives me goosebumps and peace and happiness. It’s been a bonding thing between the two of us.”

    The admiration is mutual between mother and daughter.

    “Every time Kim puts something on, she looks so beautiful,” Sandy says. “That’s what I’m striving for. She looks so good, she feels good, and she’s strong. She’s my idol. I hope I can continue as she does.”

    Men and Women over 50, bring your parents and let us improve your quality of life by restoring your strength, improving your balance, & reducing your joint pain. Try our 21-Day Strength and Longevity Program  so you can enjoy your favorite activities with your parents for years to come.


Your Personal Best Location
Your Personal Best Training Studio
Doddridge Plaza
3765 S. Alameda, Ste 102
Corpus Christi, TX 78411
(361) 857-5087 info@ypbtrainingstudio.com