Healthy Recipe, Arizona Chopped Salad
X

Functional Aging
Specialists

Find Out More
Your Personal Best Training Studio
Doddridge Plaza
3765 S. Alameda, Ste 102
Corpus Christi, TX 78411
(361) 857-5087 info@ypbtrainingstudio.com
MENU
newsletter
  1. Healthy Recipe, Arizona Chopped Salad

    Next time you’re stuck on what to bring to a potluck, offer to bring this salad. Adapted from “The Salad Lab: Whisk, Toss, and Enjoy!” by Darlene Schrijver, this colorful mélange is based on an iconic specialty of the Grand Canyon State, with ingredients typically arranged in stripes to resemble an Arizona sunset. Loaded with protein, fiber, and nutrients, it’s as filling and delicious as it is striking and a meal in itself. Be sure to wait until right before serving to toss with the refreshing herb-infused dressing so that your guests have a chance to admire your artistry. — Susan Puckett

    Ingredients
    Creamy Basil Dressing: 

    • 2/3 cup coarsely chopped fresh basil leaves
    • ¼ cup olive oil
    • ¼ cup mayonnaise
    • 3 tablespoons buttermilk
    • 2 tablespoons finely grated Parmesan cheese
    • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
    • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
    • 1 tablespoon honey
    • ½ teaspoon pressed or grated garlic
    • Sea salt and freshly cracked pepper to taste

    Salad: 

    • 1 cup pearl couscous
    • 8 cups lightly packed arugula
    • 2 cups diced red and/or yellow bell peppers
    • 1 cup chopped smoked salmon
    • 1 cup freeze-dried corn or fresh corn kernels (see note)
    • 1 cup shaved Asiago or Parmesan cheese, or 1 cup diced feta cheese
    • ½ cup toasted pepitas or roasted sunflower seeds
    • ½ cup dried cranberries 

    Instructions
    1. Make the dressing: In a medium bowl, combine the basil, olive oil, mayonnaise, buttermilk, cheese, vinegar, lemon juice, honey, and garlic. Emulsify with an immersion blender, then season to taste with salt and pepper. (Alternately, puree the ingredients in a food processor.) Pour into a bowl or other container and cover, and refrigerate until ready to serve. This may be made up to 3 days in advance.
    2. Assemble the salad: Cook the couscous in boiling, salted water according to package directions until tender and not chewy in the center, about 7 minutes. Drain, rinse, and set aside to cool completely.
    3. Place the arugula in the bottom of a large bowl and arrange the couscous, bell pepper, salmon, corn, cheese, pepitas, sunflower seeds, and cranberries in separate rows on top.
    4. Just before serving, drizzle with dressing to taste. Toss until the ingredients are evenly combined and coated with the dressing. Serve.  

    If you’re ready to create a personalized plan that’s meaningful enough to stick to… especially when the going gets tough, we’re here to help.

    In our 21-Day Longevity and Strength Program, we’ll work together to make sure you’re not just “going through the motions” to hit your goals but that you’re living a life that aligns with your values.

    Sign up here: https://go.ypbtrainingstudio.com/21-day-longevity-and-strength-program.

  2. Walking Can Prevent Back Pain, Study Finds

    A new study finds that walking regularly after a flareup of back pain can prevent another occurrence for twice as long.
     
    “Walking is a low-cost, widely accessible, and simple exercise that almost anyone can engage in, regardless of geographic location, age, or socio-economic status,” said a researcher from Sydney, Australia, where the study was conducted.
     
    It followed more than 700 people, most of them women in their 50s, who had suffered back pain that was bad enough to keep them from daily activities. The study was published in The Lancet journal.
     
    Participants also took less time off from work and cut medical visits in half, the study found.
     
    The National Institutes of Health says an earlier study found that a fitness program that combines strength, flexibility, and aerobic fitness is beneficial. 
     
    These are both just further evidence that exercise helps you feel and move better.
     
    And with back pain the second most common cause of disability, this is good news for countless millions of people.
     
    Walking improves blood flow throughout the body, reduces time spent sitting, and improves the joints, among other benefits. It also spurs the brain to solve problems and think creatively.
     
    But walking is just a first step, so to speak, in a well-rounded fitness program. You have so much more to gain from resistance training and more. Come talk to us about keeping you moving at your best. 

    We help men and women over 50 feel better, look better, and age actively- because our life isn’t over as we age; in many ways, it’s just beginning!

    Interested in changing your life for the better? Join our 21-Day Strength and Balance program to rediscover everything you’re still capable of!

    Learn more here: https://go.ypbtrainingstudio.com/21-day-longevity-and-strength-program.

  3. How Exercise Can Fight Neuropathy

    Karen Joseph had no idea what was happening years ago when the first symptoms of neuropathy began.
     
    She assumed the pain and numbness in her legs were from a spinal injury she suffered in a car crash.
     
    But after her diagnosis in 2014, Karen learned how debilitating neuropathy can be. And she had to make changes to her workouts.
     
    “I could have gone on disability back then, but I knew I needed to move,” she says now at 65. She lost speed and agility and worried about falling. Running turned her legs to concrete, and power-walking didn’t get her heart rate up enough. 
     
    Karen is a retired Army officer, former bodybuilding champion, and longtime personal trainer. After neuropathy hit, she had to find new ways to keep herself in top condition. Most of her clients are over 50, and some have neuropathy themselves — weakness and numbness due to nerve damage.
     
    “I downscaled it a bit, but I still do it,” Karen says. She also found help in a new high-tech tool using virtual reality.

    What Is Neuropathy?
     
    About 30 million Americans have “peripheral neuropathy,” according to the Foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy.  Men get it more than women, and the risk is higher for mature adults. 
     
    Neuropathy refers to disorders caused by damage to the nervous system. Numbness and pain can occur, particularly in the feet and hands.
     
    It has a range of causes, such as diabetes, traumatic injury, inflammatory infections, protein abnormalities, poor nutrition, and exposure to toxic chemicals.

    “The best way to prevent peripheral neuropathy is to manage medical conditions that put you at risk, such as diabetes, alcoholism, or rheumatoid arthritis,” says the Mayo Clinic.

    Regular exercise and a proper diet also help prevent it. After diagnosis, exercise can reduce the pain and fight symptoms. 

    See your doctor if you experience numbness or tingling in your feet and hands, extreme sensitivity to touch, lack of coordination and falling, or muscle weakness.

    How Fitness Helped
     
    For Karen, exercise has been a part of her life forever, and she can’t imagine stopping because of her age or condition.
     
    In addition to working out with weights, Karen has found excellent cardio exercise using the Supernatural app on her Oculus virtual reality system. 
     
    “I can get my heart rate up to 160, 170 beats per minute, and I can work out for two hours,” she says. Participants practice boxing moves or strike moving virtual targets with virtual bats, set to popular music and in immersive environments like mountaintops and desserts. The choreography also helps cognitively. 
     
    “I’m soaked when I’m finished. My heart rate is up. It’s a workout,” Karen says. “Anything I can do that makes me feel like me and makes me feel functional, I love that.”
     
    Exercise is good for all kinds of chronic conditions. There is hope! Let us show you.

    Join our 21 Day Strength and Longevity program: https://go.ypbtrainingstudio.com/21-day-longevity-and-strength-program?fbclid=IwZXh0bgNhZW0CMTAAAR1PjxBtLa6q-R7ZNGOuvBXn7bcYs9UmhiH5DOkGLw2NNF0raVMCDyVRiCE_aem_W-dhjRUJEHA2UJDQ5qp0IQ.

  4. Healthy Recipe, Korean-Glazed Tofu and Broccoli 

    This stands an excellent chance of winning over even the most die-hard carnivore. Tofu is first cut into planks, then patted dry and dredged in cornstarch and roasted at a high temperature to ensure an extra-crispy coating. It gets a savory-sweet, umami-loaded sauce made with the Korean condiment called gochujang (found in Asian sections of many supermarkets). Add broccoli and rice for a full dinner. Serves 4. – Susan Puckett, adapted from Christopher Kimball’s “Milk Street 365.

    Ingredients

    • 2 tablespoons vegetable or other neutral oil
    • 2 tablespoons gochujang
    • 2 tablespoons honey
    • 2 tablespoons sesame oil, plus more for serving
    • Kosher salt and black pepper
    • ¼ cup cornstarch
    • 14-ounce container firm or extra-firm tofu, drained, sliced into ½-inch-thick planks and patted dry
    • 12 ounces broccoli florets
    • 2 tablespoons sesame seeds
    • Hot, cooked rice for serving 

    Instructions

    1. Set a rack in the upper-middle portion of the oven and preheat to 475. Brush a large, rimmed sheet pan with vegetable oil. 
    2. In a small bowl, whisk together the gochujang, honey, 1 tablespoon of the sesame oil, ½ teaspoon salt and ¼ teaspoon pepper; set aside.
    3. Put the cornstarch in a wide, shallow dish. Add the tofu slices; turn to coat. Put the broccoli florets in a medium bowl, drizzle with the remaining sesame oil and 1/4 teaspoon each of salt and pepper; toss to coat.
    4. Arrange the tofu in a single layer on one side of the sheet pan and the broccoli florets on the other. Roast for 15 to 18 minutes.   
    5. Remove the baking sheet and lightly brush the tofu with the gochujang mixture. Flip the tofu with a thin metal spatula and lightly brush with more. 
    6. Return the pan to the oven for about 10 minutes.  
    7. Remove from the oven, lightly brush the tofu with more of the gochujang mixture and sprinkle the tofu and broccoli with the sesame seeds. Continue baking about 5 minutes. 
    8. Serve the tofu and broccoli with rice and drizzle with a little more sesame oil, if desired. 

    If you’re ready to create a personalized plan that’s meaningful enough to stick to… especially when the going gets tough, we’re here to help.

    Join our 21-Day Strength and Balance program to rediscover everything you’re still capable of!

    Sign up here: https://go.ypbtrainingstudio.com/21-day-longevity-and-strength-program

  5. Is Water Enough to Stay Hydrated?

    Drinking plenty of water is one of the simplest and most important things you can do for your health.
     
    We talk about this a lot because staying properly hydrated is key to maintaining body temperature, helping you feel full, and maintaining good skin.
     
    But with a wide range of “sports drinks” available, you might wonder if you need these sometimes, too. (Think Gatorade and the like.)
     
    Let’s discuss.
     
    A benefit of these drinks is that they generally have added electrolytes like sodium, potassium, and magnesium, which are essential minerals we lose through sweat. These electrolytes are also found in a proper diet. Water alone may not replenish these essential minerals for people who are exercising intensely or in high heat, which can lead to imbalances and cramping.
     
    Some sports or “energy” drinks also contain caffeine, which can improve alertness, focus, and performance. Of course, not everyone wants caffeine.
     
    And many are jacked up with added sugars and calories, so read the labels and don’t drink too many.
     
    Choosing between water and energy drinks ultimately depends on your individual needs, the intensity and duration of your workouts, and overall health goals. 
     
    Water remains the gold standard for everyday hydration and light to moderate exercise, while energy drinks, due to their electrolyte and carbohydrate content, can be valuable during intense or prolonged physical activity.
     
    Talk to us if you have any questions. In the meantime, have a glass of water!

    In our 21-Day Longevity and Strength Program, we’ll work together to ensure you’re not just “going through the motions” to hit your goals but living a life that aligns with your values.

    Sign up here: https://www.ypbstudio.com/21day.

  6. Summer Living: Healthy Tips for the Season

    Everybody loves summer, right?
     
    The sunshine and warm weather can lift our spirits and encourage healthy living. Jogging, gardening, hiking, outdoor swimming… the options are endless with the longer days. 
     
    Summer is also an excellent time to remind ourselves about healthy lifestyle choices. So, let’s review how to make the most of the season.
     
    Hydrate Yourself
    That’s right – warmer weather means we must be even more vigilant about drinking plenty of water. Among the many benefits: It keeps us cooler.
     
    Getting the right amount of water each day also helps increase our metabolism, which allows us lose weight and keep it off. Plus, drinking a glass before a meal helps us feel full faster, making us less likely to overeat.
     
    Water is also good for digestion, healthy skin – and just about everything related to a healthy body.
     
    Add cucumber slices or fruit to a pitcher for a refreshing, light flavor.
     
    Drink water even when you’re not thirsty. A good rule of thumb is to drink between a half-ounce and 1 ounce of water for every pound of body weight, according to WebMD.com.
     
    Avoid the Heat
    Enjoy your outdoor activities before the highest heat of the day.
     
    For instance, if you like to garden, you should do your digging around breakfast time rather than in the afternoon.
     
    An evening walk or jog can be much more pleasurable than taking one in the hot middle of the day.
     
    Wear Sunscreen and Hats
    Too much exposure ages the skin and can lead to skin cancers. Consumer Reports says 61 percent of people over 60 don’t use sunscreen. And skin cancers are up among Baby Boomers.
     
    So, get something with an SPF between 30 and 50. Look for UVA and UVB protection. Reapply frequently, and don’t be stingy. 
     
    The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends sunscreen and hats, staying in the shade, wearing clothing to the ankles, and wearing a long-sleeved shirt.
     
    For a natural, do-it-yourself sunburn treatment, consider essential oils: peppermint, chamomile, tea tree, lavender, or oatmeal baths. Men’s Health recommends a spray made from 1 ounce of pure aloe, 1 ounce of coconut oil, 2 ounces of witch hazel, 5 drops of peppermint oil, and 5 drops of lavender oil.
     
    Win the Mosquito Wars
    Empty flowerpots, buckets, and other water containers to prevent mosquitoes from breeding. Use outdoor repellents around the yard. Use yellow-hued outdoor lightbulbs since they attract fewer pests.
     
    The CDC recommends mosquito repellent with 5 percent to 50 percent DEET to keep the bugs off your body. Others swear by Off! Deep Woods Insect Repellent Avon Skin So Soft, Repel Tick Defense, and other easily found items.
     
    Enjoy fresh fruits and vegetables, avoid too much alcohol, and get plenty of rest. 
     
    We’re here to keep you moving – and it’s always safe and plenty cool in here with us!

    We help men and women over 50 feel better, look better, and age actively- because our life isn’t over as we age; in many ways, it’s just beginning!

    Join our 21-Day Strength and Balance program to rediscover everything you’re still capable of!

    Sign up here: https://go.ypbtrainingstudio.com/21-day-longevity-and-strength-program

    If you have any questions, call us at (361-857-5087), and we’ll discuss how we can help you!

  7. Healthy Recipe, Mango Shrimp

    Mangoes are low in calories and high in fiber, vitamins A and C, and other nutrients. In this recipe, adapted from one in “Milk Street 365,” mango plays a prominent role in a quick entrée that tastes like summer. Chunks of fresh or frozen fruit are added to a panful of sauteed aromatics and punctuated with mustard seed and chili. Turmeric-seasoned shrimp at the last minute enhances its golden hue, and unsweetened coconut adds tropical flavor. Serve over rice. Serves 4. — Susan Puckett

    Ingredients

    • 1½ lbs. large to extra-large shrimp, peeled, deveined, thawed
    • 1 tsp ground turmeric
    • 2 tbsp grapeseed or other neutral oil
    • 1 small red or white onion, peeled, halved, thinly sliced
    • 1 tbsp brown mustard seeds
    • 1 tbsp finely grated fresh ginger
    • 1 tbsp finely grated garlic
    • 1 Fresno or jalapeno chili, stemmed, seeded, minced
    • ¾ cup unsweetened shredded coconut
    • 1 large ripe mango, peeled, pitted, and cubed, or 12 ounces (3 cups) frozen mango chunks, thawed
    • 2 limes, one juiced and zested and the other cut in wedges for garnish
    • Salt and pepper
    • ¼ cup chopped roasted peanuts, optional
    • ½ cup torn cilantro leaves, optional
    • Basmati or plain white rice for serving

    Instructions

    1. Toss shrimp with turmeric and salt; set aside.
    2. Place oil in a large skillet and heat over medium heat until shimmering. Add onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until it begins to brown, 5-6 minutes. Add mustard seeds, ginger, garlic, and half the chili; cook, stirring, for about 1 minute.
    3. Stir in ½ cup of the coconut, mango, and 1 cup of water, then bring to a simmer. Reduce heat to medium-low and cook, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until mango is soft and most water has evaporated, 6 to 8 minutes.
    4. Mash mango with a fork until mostly smooth but with some chunks. Stir in shrimp and cook, uncovered, over medium heat, stirring once or twice, until opaque. 
    5. Remove from heat and stir in remaining chili, lime zest, and 1 tbsp of lime juice—taste for seasoning. 
    6. Serve over hot rice. 

    In our 21-Day Longevity and Strength Program, we’ll work together to ensure you’re not just “going through the motions” to hit your goals but living a life that aligns with your values.

    Sign up here: https://www.ypbstudio.com/21day.

  8. Success Story: Back to Health – and Fun

    Many people reach a turning point when they realize they must start living healthier.
     
    For Rose Newman, it came on vacation in Costa Rica.
     
    At 59, she was disappointed to find herself hanging back at the hotel with the older relatives when others were hiking and enjoying the outdoors.
     
    “I was the fat lady who didn’t want to be on vacation,” she recalls.
     
    Back home, she started walking and then found small group training at a fitness center. Although arthritis makes running difficult, Rose began enrolling in 5K walks and training for “aqua-bike” races, which combine swimming and bicycling.
     
    She wanted to lose 60 pounds before turning 60, blew away that goal by dropping 80 — and is now heading toward 100. She’s dropped 12 sizes and no longer needs medicine for high blood pressure.
     
    “It’s really been a fun journey,” says Rose. “I’ve set myself up for success going forward in life.”
     
    She exercises six days a week, usually in small groups or with an individual trainer. “It’s playtime for me to go to the gym,” she says. “It’s fun to see what my body can do.”
     
    The longtime vegetarian also cut back on “white food” carbohydrates like pasta, bread and rice.
     
    Next up are indoor “rock” climbing and returning to Costa Rica.
     
    “I’m going back this year and looking forward to going on those hikes,” Rose says.

    If you’re over 50 and feeling behind in your life rather than ahead, our team of functional aging specialists is here to help you reclaim your life! 

    We help men and women over 50 feel better, look better, and age actively- because our life isn’t over as we age; in many ways, it’s just beginning!

    Learn more here: https://www.ypbstudio.com/21day.

    If you have any questions, call us at (361-857-5087), and we’ll discuss how we can help you!

  9. Fitness Facts: The 3 Planes of Movement

    Here’s a common exercise question, followed by a helpful explanation.

    “Why do you sometimes have us twist our bodies while we’re also moving forward? Or lift our arms in front while lunging to the side?”

    You see, fitness isn’t just about doing one thing at a time, like lifting a weight now and then running ahead in a straight line later.

    It’s about understanding how your body moves to improve and protect it.

    So, rather than think about moving just one way at a time, pay attention to how you actually move.
    Sometimes straight ahead, sometimes side to side… sometimes twisting, looking back… and combining more than one of these movements without realizing it.

    Your body is amazing! It wants to move. And it wants to move in all directions all the time. That’s a key component of functional fitness, the three planes of movement in the gym and in life.

    First, think about how you move frontward, backward, or up and down in a straight line – like walking or running. That’s one plane of movement.

    Common exercises to strengthen your abilities in this plane include squats, which require moving up and down and engaging leg muscles and the core, and lunges, which also develop balance and coordination.

    Next, notice side-to-side movements, like moving at the baseline while playing tennis or stepping over something in your path.

    Exercises here include lateral lunges, which involve stepping to the side and targeting the inner and outer thighs, glutes, and hips, and jumping jacks, which use multiple muscle groups.

    Finally, notice how you rotate (or, maybe, how you DON’T rotate as well as you’d like). Can you turn around easily? Put away groceries – or swing a bat or golf club?

    Exercises include Russian twists, core exercises that involve rotating your torso from side to side to engage the oblique muscles, and cable woodchops, which mimic chopping wood to strengthen the obliques, shoulders, and hips.

    Add Them Together
    Now, here’s where it gets great. A solid fitness routine will incorporate multi-planar movements, which go through at least two planes of movement. Consider bending down to scoop up a toddler or lunging to make a tennis shot.

    A typical example of a multi-planar exercise is the lunge with a twist. You start at a standing position, step forward to perform a lunge, and twist your body in one direction at the bottom; then twist back to center and press up to the starting position.

    This is a more natural way to move like you do when shopping, gardening, or playing Pickleball. You’re this way, that way, and all around. By working on your strength, stamina, and agility with us regularly, you’ll improve your functional fitness, muscle development, balance, and more.

    So, let’s mix it up! We are here to help in any way you need—forward/back, side to side or rotational.

    Interested in changing your life for the better?

    We help men and women over 50 feel better, look better, and age actively- because our life isn’t over as we age; in many ways, it’s just beginning!

     Join our 21-Day Strength and Balance program to rediscover everything you’re still capable of!

    Sign up here: https://www.ypbstudio.com/21day.

    If you have any questions, call us at (361-857-5087), and we’ll chat to find out how we can help YOU!

  10. Healthy Recipe, Spanakopita Dip

    Triangles of the traditional savory Greek pie known as spanakopita are familiar at fancy cocktail parties. Skip the buttery phyllo pastry, and you’ve got the basis for an easy, crowd-pleasing dip that’s actually good for you. This recipe, adapted from one in “Big Dip Energy,” blends the spinach and feta filling with Greek yogurt and herbs and serves it hot or cold with baked pita or bagel chips, raw veggies, or both. Leftovers could be smeared on a bagel, tucked in a pita with sliced tomatoes for a sandwich, or stirred into pasta for a fast, protein-rich meal. Serves 8-10. – Susan Puckett

    Ingredients

    • 4 tablespoons olive oil (plus more, to taste)
    • 1 large onion, chopped
    • 5 garlic cloves, chopped
    • 1 package (10 ounces) of frozen chopped spinach, thawed and wrung out in a tea towel
    • Kosher salt
    • 1 cup plain whole-milk Greek yogurt
    • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
    • 6 ounces feta in brine, crumbled, plus 2 tablespoons of the reserved brine
    • Pinch of crushed red pepper
    • 1 small bunch scallions, trimmed and thinly sliced (white and green parts)
    • 2 to 3 tablespoons chopped fresh dill
    • 2 to 3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
    • Pita chips, bagel chips, and/or raw vegetables for dipping 

    Instructions

    1. In a large saucepan or high-sided skillet, heat 2 tablespoons of the oil over medium heat. Add the onion and sauté, stirring occasionally, until just starting to turn brown, 5 to 7 minutes. 
    2. Add the garlic and cook a minute or so longer until fragrant. Add 1 more tablespoon of the oil and the spinach and cook another 3 to 5 minutes, stirring occasionally, until warmed. Season with ½ teaspoon of salt.
    3. In a medium bowl, combine the yogurt, lemon juice, feta, crushed red pepper, most of the scallions and herbs (reserve some for garnish), feta brine, and 1 to 2 tablespoons more of the oil, depending on how rich you want it. Stir well.
    4. To serve hot, add the creamy mixture to the spinach mixture in the pan and heat on medium-low until warmed, about 5 minutes. To serve cold, add the spinach mixture to the creamy mixture in the bowl, mix well, and refrigerate until ready to serve. (It’s also good at room temperature!)
    5. Garnish with reserved scallions and herbs, and serve with dippers of your choice.

    If you’re ready to create a personalized plan that’s meaningful enough to stick to… especially when the going gets tough, we’re here to help.

    In our 21-Day Longevity and Strength Program, we’ll work together to ensure you’re not just “going through the motions” to hit your goals but living a life that aligns with your values.

    Sign up here: https://www.ypbstudio.com/21day.


Your Personal Best Location
Your Personal Best Training Studio
Doddridge Plaza
3765 S. Alameda, Ste 102
Corpus Christi, TX 78411
(361) 857-5087 info@ypbtrainingstudio.com